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Noah E. Robinson
Professor of Chemistry

Professor Noah Robinson carries out laboratory research on the deamidation of peptides and proteins and on the development of new analytical methods for the clinical laboratory. He also works on the development of Robinson home schooling techniques, which are used by more than 60,000 American students, and on the public dissemination of information on civil defense.

Educated at Southern Oregon University and the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Noah Robinson is principle author of numerous research papers on the deamidation of peptides and proteins, including four published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA and the book, Molecular Clocks Deamidation of Asparaginyl and Glutaminyl Residues in Peptides and Proteins, by N. E. Robinson and A. B. Robinson, Althouse Press, 2004, which is the primary research reference in this subject. Between 1998 and 2005, Noah Robinson also carried out research at Rockefeller University with R. Bruce Merrifield during which approximately 900 peptides of various structures were synthesized for use in studies of deamidation.

Dr. Robinson also works on the Petition project opposed to the hypothesis of "human-caused global warming." In this effort he has published in the Wall Street Journal and is coauthor of Environmental Effects of Increased Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide by A. B. Robinson, N. E. Robinson, and W. Soon, (2007) J. Am. Phys. Sur. 12, 79-90, which is currently the most widely read review article on this subject.


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